spocksfatalboner:

spocksfatalboner:

yanno those white noise sites like rainymood.com or the cafe shop one? i’d like an Enterprise bridge one, please. Soft beeping, maybe some chill version of amok time theme or something, and every now and then the crew calmly issuing orders or reading something sciency. im watching the lights of zetar and this evasive scene? is super calming and i need it on infinite repeat somehow.
someone make this happen.

SO APPARENTLY I AM NOT THE ONLY PERSON WHO WANTED SOMETHING LIKE THIS

Star Trek TNG Ambient Engine Noise (Idling for 24 hrs)

Star Trek: The Original Series Engine Sound ( Idling for 2+ hours )

>Star Trek: Voyager Engineering Warp Core Background Ambience

Star Trek: TNG Bridge Background Ambience

Star Trek: TOS USS-Enterprise Bridge Background Ambience (THIS IS 100% WHAT I WANTED)

Star Trek: The Next Generation USS Enterprise D “Ten Forward”

Star Trek: Voyager Bridge Background Ambience

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine “Quark’s Bar”

Star Trek: TNG “Cargo Bay” Background Ambience

A list of Star Trek Audio noises (some of them repeat for a long time)

theenergyissue:

Gansu Wind Farm is the World’s Largest
Though the project will not be fully completed until 2020, Gansu Wind Farm in the northwest province of Gansu in China is already the world’s largest. Begun in 2009, the farm has a capacity of 5,160 MW, five times greater than that of the next two largest wind farms, Jaisalmer Wind Farm in India and Alta Wind Energy Center in California. By the time of completion, it is expected to have grow to 20,000 megawatts at an estimated cost of 120 billion Chinese yuan ($17.5 billion). The project, which is being built by more than 20 developers, is one of six national wind power megaprojects approved by the Chinese government. Gansu reflects a larger move to invest heavily in renewables, a surprising turn for a country often associated with pollution, rapid industrialization, and short-sighted planning. In fact, though China, likely to surpass the United States as the world’s largest oil importer, accounted for one-third of the world’s growth in oil consumption in 2013, it is also the leader in renewable energy investment. As Jack Perkowski notes in Forbes, China spent a total of $56.3 billion on wind, solar and other renewable projects last year and is now home to about 24 percent of the world’s renewable power capacity.
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Gansu Wind Farm is the World’s Largest
Though the project will not be fully completed until 2020, Gansu Wind Farm in the northwest province of Gansu in China is already the world’s largest. Begun in 2009, the farm has a capacity of 5,160 MW, five times greater than that of the next two largest wind farms, Jaisalmer Wind Farm in India and Alta Wind Energy Center in California. By the time of completion, it is expected to have grow to 20,000 megawatts at an estimated cost of 120 billion Chinese yuan ($17.5 billion). The project, which is being built by more than 20 developers, is one of six national wind power megaprojects approved by the Chinese government. Gansu reflects a larger move to invest heavily in renewables, a surprising turn for a country often associated with pollution, rapid industrialization, and short-sighted planning. In fact, though China, likely to surpass the United States as the world’s largest oil importer, accounted for one-third of the world’s growth in oil consumption in 2013, it is also the leader in renewable energy investment. As Jack Perkowski notes in Forbes, China spent a total of $56.3 billion on wind, solar and other renewable projects last year and is now home to about 24 percent of the world’s renewable power capacity.
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Gansu Wind Farm is the World’s Largest
Though the project will not be fully completed until 2020, Gansu Wind Farm in the northwest province of Gansu in China is already the world’s largest. Begun in 2009, the farm has a capacity of 5,160 MW, five times greater than that of the next two largest wind farms, Jaisalmer Wind Farm in India and Alta Wind Energy Center in California. By the time of completion, it is expected to have grow to 20,000 megawatts at an estimated cost of 120 billion Chinese yuan ($17.5 billion). The project, which is being built by more than 20 developers, is one of six national wind power megaprojects approved by the Chinese government. Gansu reflects a larger move to invest heavily in renewables, a surprising turn for a country often associated with pollution, rapid industrialization, and short-sighted planning. In fact, though China, likely to surpass the United States as the world’s largest oil importer, accounted for one-third of the world’s growth in oil consumption in 2013, it is also the leader in renewable energy investment. As Jack Perkowski notes in Forbes, China spent a total of $56.3 billion on wind, solar and other renewable projects last year and is now home to about 24 percent of the world’s renewable power capacity.
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Gansu Wind Farm is the World’s Largest
Though the project will not be fully completed until 2020, Gansu Wind Farm in the northwest province of Gansu in China is already the world’s largest. Begun in 2009, the farm has a capacity of 5,160 MW, five times greater than that of the next two largest wind farms, Jaisalmer Wind Farm in India and Alta Wind Energy Center in California. By the time of completion, it is expected to have grow to 20,000 megawatts at an estimated cost of 120 billion Chinese yuan ($17.5 billion). The project, which is being built by more than 20 developers, is one of six national wind power megaprojects approved by the Chinese government. Gansu reflects a larger move to invest heavily in renewables, a surprising turn for a country often associated with pollution, rapid industrialization, and short-sighted planning. In fact, though China, likely to surpass the United States as the world’s largest oil importer, accounted for one-third of the world’s growth in oil consumption in 2013, it is also the leader in renewable energy investment. As Jack Perkowski notes in Forbes, China spent a total of $56.3 billion on wind, solar and other renewable projects last year and is now home to about 24 percent of the world’s renewable power capacity.
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Gansu Wind Farm is the World’s Largest
Though the project will not be fully completed until 2020, Gansu Wind Farm in the northwest province of Gansu in China is already the world’s largest. Begun in 2009, the farm has a capacity of 5,160 MW, five times greater than that of the next two largest wind farms, Jaisalmer Wind Farm in India and Alta Wind Energy Center in California. By the time of completion, it is expected to have grow to 20,000 megawatts at an estimated cost of 120 billion Chinese yuan ($17.5 billion). The project, which is being built by more than 20 developers, is one of six national wind power megaprojects approved by the Chinese government. Gansu reflects a larger move to invest heavily in renewables, a surprising turn for a country often associated with pollution, rapid industrialization, and short-sighted planning. In fact, though China, likely to surpass the United States as the world’s largest oil importer, accounted for one-third of the world’s growth in oil consumption in 2013, it is also the leader in renewable energy investment. As Jack Perkowski notes in Forbes, China spent a total of $56.3 billion on wind, solar and other renewable projects last year and is now home to about 24 percent of the world’s renewable power capacity.
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Gansu Wind Farm is the World’s Largest
Though the project will not be fully completed until 2020, Gansu Wind Farm in the northwest province of Gansu in China is already the world’s largest. Begun in 2009, the farm has a capacity of 5,160 MW, five times greater than that of the next two largest wind farms, Jaisalmer Wind Farm in India and Alta Wind Energy Center in California. By the time of completion, it is expected to have grow to 20,000 megawatts at an estimated cost of 120 billion Chinese yuan ($17.5 billion). The project, which is being built by more than 20 developers, is one of six national wind power megaprojects approved by the Chinese government. Gansu reflects a larger move to invest heavily in renewables, a surprising turn for a country often associated with pollution, rapid industrialization, and short-sighted planning. In fact, though China, likely to surpass the United States as the world’s largest oil importer, accounted for one-third of the world’s growth in oil consumption in 2013, it is also the leader in renewable energy investment. As Jack Perkowski notes in Forbes, China spent a total of $56.3 billion on wind, solar and other renewable projects last year and is now home to about 24 percent of the world’s renewable power capacity.
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Gansu Wind Farm is the World’s Largest
Though the project will not be fully completed until 2020, Gansu Wind Farm in the northwest province of Gansu in China is already the world’s largest. Begun in 2009, the farm has a capacity of 5,160 MW, five times greater than that of the next two largest wind farms, Jaisalmer Wind Farm in India and Alta Wind Energy Center in California. By the time of completion, it is expected to have grow to 20,000 megawatts at an estimated cost of 120 billion Chinese yuan ($17.5 billion). The project, which is being built by more than 20 developers, is one of six national wind power megaprojects approved by the Chinese government. Gansu reflects a larger move to invest heavily in renewables, a surprising turn for a country often associated with pollution, rapid industrialization, and short-sighted planning. In fact, though China, likely to surpass the United States as the world’s largest oil importer, accounted for one-third of the world’s growth in oil consumption in 2013, it is also the leader in renewable energy investment. As Jack Perkowski notes in Forbes, China spent a total of $56.3 billion on wind, solar and other renewable projects last year and is now home to about 24 percent of the world’s renewable power capacity.
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Gansu Wind Farm is the World’s Largest
Though the project will not be fully completed until 2020, Gansu Wind Farm in the northwest province of Gansu in China is already the world’s largest. Begun in 2009, the farm has a capacity of 5,160 MW, five times greater than that of the next two largest wind farms, Jaisalmer Wind Farm in India and Alta Wind Energy Center in California. By the time of completion, it is expected to have grow to 20,000 megawatts at an estimated cost of 120 billion Chinese yuan ($17.5 billion). The project, which is being built by more than 20 developers, is one of six national wind power megaprojects approved by the Chinese government. Gansu reflects a larger move to invest heavily in renewables, a surprising turn for a country often associated with pollution, rapid industrialization, and short-sighted planning. In fact, though China, likely to surpass the United States as the world’s largest oil importer, accounted for one-third of the world’s growth in oil consumption in 2013, it is also the leader in renewable energy investment. As Jack Perkowski notes in Forbes, China spent a total of $56.3 billion on wind, solar and other renewable projects last year and is now home to about 24 percent of the world’s renewable power capacity.
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Gansu Wind Farm is the World’s Largest
Though the project will not be fully completed until 2020, Gansu Wind Farm in the northwest province of Gansu in China is already the world’s largest. Begun in 2009, the farm has a capacity of 5,160 MW, five times greater than that of the next two largest wind farms, Jaisalmer Wind Farm in India and Alta Wind Energy Center in California. By the time of completion, it is expected to have grow to 20,000 megawatts at an estimated cost of 120 billion Chinese yuan ($17.5 billion). The project, which is being built by more than 20 developers, is one of six national wind power megaprojects approved by the Chinese government. Gansu reflects a larger move to invest heavily in renewables, a surprising turn for a country often associated with pollution, rapid industrialization, and short-sighted planning. In fact, though China, likely to surpass the United States as the world’s largest oil importer, accounted for one-third of the world’s growth in oil consumption in 2013, it is also the leader in renewable energy investment. As Jack Perkowski notes in Forbes, China spent a total of $56.3 billion on wind, solar and other renewable projects last year and is now home to about 24 percent of the world’s renewable power capacity.
Zoom Info

theenergyissue:

Gansu Wind Farm is the World’s Largest

Though the project will not be fully completed until 2020, Gansu Wind Farm in the northwest province of Gansu in China is already the world’s largest. Begun in 2009, the farm has a capacity of 5,160 MW, five times greater than that of the next two largest wind farms, Jaisalmer Wind Farm in India and Alta Wind Energy Center in California. By the time of completion, it is expected to have grow to 20,000 megawatts at an estimated cost of 120 billion Chinese yuan ($17.5 billion). The project, which is being built by more than 20 developers, is one of six national wind power megaprojects approved by the Chinese government. Gansu reflects a larger move to invest heavily in renewables, a surprising turn for a country often associated with pollution, rapid industrialization, and short-sighted planning. In fact, though China, likely to surpass the United States as the world’s largest oil importer, accounted for one-third of the world’s growth in oil consumption in 2013, it is also the leader in renewable energy investment. As Jack Perkowski notes in Forbes, China spent a total of $56.3 billion on wind, solar and other renewable projects last year and is now home to about 24 percent of the world’s renewable power capacity.

spacewaluigi:

July 21st is the day that Mario Tennis for the N64 was released in japan, and it also marks the first appearance of Waluigi!

Happy birthday Waluigi!

image