carolinafrica:

The Bullfrog 
It’s a rare thing to witness the extinction of an entire class of animal. We weren’t around to see the dinosaurs disappear, and the dodo was just one species of bird — it’s not like all birds slowly disappeared. But according to many conservation scientists, that’s exactly what amphibians are facing: Frogs and others in the amphibia class are on their way out unless the conservation community takes immediate action.
The amphibia class in general — frogs are just the most populous group of the class, which also includes salamanders and caecilians — has actually been on the decline for some time. Pollution, global warming and habitat destruction from human development have already taken a serious toll. Frogs, in particular, have suffered, having lost an estimated 170 species in the last 10 years alone, with another 1,900 in a threatened state, which is one step below the endangered designation (meaning extinction is imminent). But only part of the destruction is man-made. A fungus identified in the last decade seems to be speeding up the death of the worldwide frog population exponentially. The chytrid fungus coats the frog’s skin and makes its pores non-functional. Because a frog relies on its porous skin for hydration and for some of its respiration, the fungus essentially cuts off its water supply and makes it difficult to breathe. In the end, the frog dies from dehydration.Source: Wildlife and Nature - www.facebook.com/pages/Wild-for-Wildlife-and-Nature/279792438707552
 

carolinafrica:

The Bullfrog

It’s a rare thing to witness the extinction of an entire class of animal. We weren’t around to see the dinosaurs disappear, and the dodo was just one species of bird — it’s not like all birds slowly disappeared. But according to many conservation scientists, that’s exactly what amphibians are facing: Frogs and others in the amphibia class are on their way out unless the conservation community takes immediate action.

The amphibia class in general — frogs are just the most populous group of the class, which also includes salamanders and caecilians — has actually been on the decline for some time. Pollution, global warming and habitat destruction from human development have already taken a serious toll. Frogs, in particular, have suffered, having lost an estimated 170 species in the last 10 years alone, with another 1,900 in a threatened state, which is one step below the endangered designation (meaning extinction is imminent). But only part of the destruction is man-made. A fungus identified in the last decade seems to be speeding up the death of the worldwide frog population exponentially. The chytrid fungus coats the frog’s skin and makes its pores non-functional. Because a frog relies on its porous skin for hydration and for some of its respiration, the fungus essentially cuts off its water supply and makes it difficult to breathe. In the end, the frog dies from dehydration.

Source: Wildlife and Nature - www.facebook.com/pages/Wild-for-Wildlife-and-Nature/279792438707552